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Refugee's gather under the shade of a tree in searing heat at Etunda Refugee Camp, Namibia.Velise wears the traditional beaded wigs called Ena meant for girls of the Mudimba tribeCooking what little food they can find at Etunda Refugee Camp.Mwandjukatji holds the food that will have to feed her children for an entire day.Tjilanbi Mwaongana, 30, looks out through his cardboard house. Most of the inhabitants of Etunda Refugee Camp build their shelters with pieces of cardboard boxes and leftover blankets.On the way it was common to find a person with a baby that had passed away and I literally couldn't do anything, maybe just stop and console the person and then move on. The thought that this could happen to my children got into my head as well. So, I was just walking and having faith... Diolinda, 46 years.Venonya is 1 year old and she crossed the border from Angola to Namibia already with severe malnutrition. Through aid provided by the Red Cross volunteers in Etunda Refugee Camp she was able to go to hospital with her grandmother, Diolinda, and receive immediate treatment for her condition.Mekondjo, 29, migrated from Angola to Namibia with polio to look for a better life. He did it without a vehicle and crawled for 170 kilometres.Teresa, 25, and her daughter Jopondje, 2, at their shelter in Etunda Refugee Camp, Namibia. Many families weave together pieces of cardboard with small plastic bags until they form walls made up of dozens of pieces.Portrait of Mwandjukatji at Etunda Refugee Camp, Namibia.“This shelter is not as strong, it's not the same as home. For our homes we used to use strong sticks and sand mixed with cow dung, plus we had a fire inside the house. This is not the same as our homes, we can't put a fire inside, and when it rains it seeps in.” Mwandjukatji at Etunda Refugee Camp, Namibia.Mwandjukatji sits with her daughter inside her shelter at Etunda Refugee Camp, Namibia. Like hundreds of other people their shelters are made of materials they ask for from nearby furniture shops.The Kunene River that splits Angola and Namibia. Police boats potrol the river to prevent migrants from crossing into Namibia in the hope fertile land and a better life. They explain that many are lost crossing the river, taken by the numerous crocodiles.Kahakojo Katjeja at Kunene river which she crossed when she migrated from Angola due to the drought causing hunger in their villages.(fKakureukua (left) and Vahepapi (right) at Kunene river. Both women cross the river in an effort to escape hunger in Angola.Kahakojo (left) and Rosa (right) at Kunene river which they crossed when they migrated from Angola due to the drought causing hunger in their villages.“You stop fearing anything, you just decide to cross when you are hungry. Even if something could have happened to me, I just had to cross to Namibia. Because of hunger.” Usenia with her daughterMbawiramo, 37, is a members of a group from the Zimba tribe, who are migrating from Angola to Namibia across difficult parched Namibian landscape.Kumbanu, 51, takes rest while travelling across a dry and arid landscape to reach Namibia.Members of the Zimba tribe migrate from Angola to Namibia across an unforgiving landscape.Woman find a water source at a dried up river bed on their journey from Angola to Namibia.Standing hungry and exhausted Twapwiratju advised her husband Mburajongambi to leave their village in Angola. After seeing the food situation worsening they thought that the solution would be to leave rather than stay and potentially face fatal hunger.“Some of my family had passed away because of this drought and because of the lack of food…so I said to myself, 'I will not allow my children to also die like the others, so I have to take them across to Namibia and look for a better life because if I stay in this place my children will die from hunger.'”The road to Opuwo, Kunene region, where many Angolan migrants have settled after migrating away from the drought in their homeland.Muajungatji lives in a small shelter built out of cardboard boxes, plastic, and blankets. Like many women of her community she collects firewood early in the morning to sell at the market and later on buy some food.A settlement for migrants coming from Angola in Opuwo, Namibia.Refugees gather for food which consists of porridge and contains few nutrients.Muajungatji collects fire wood all day long in intense heat. She has no choice as it is the only form of income since she arrived from Angola.A landscape of the Kunene region, Namibia. The area surrounding Opuwo, in the Kunene region of Namibia is also suffering from decreased rainfall.“If you look at our necklaces, they used to be tight around our necks. But now that we have nothing to eat our necklaces are loose around our neck.” Uapona talks about hunger while collecting firewoodWoman collect firewood to sell at the market in Opuwo to buy some food with the money.When we sell wood sometimes we get some money to buy food… Yet, it's not easy for us to collect wood. We have to walk for a long distance to find enough wood to sell. Muapata UozombambiMuapata Uozombambi and his family now chops wood to be sold at the market in Opuwo so his family can buy some food. During the time when Muapata and his family were considering leaving Angola they survived by eating grass stalks.Muapata left his village in Angola due to the lack of food brought on by an intense drought. During the time when Muapata and his family were considering leaving Angola they survived by eating grass stalks.A group of people who migrated from Angola sleeping in a set of shelters in Otuzemba, an area in Opuwo where migrants coming from Angola have settled. There is no more room to sleep inside so many are forced to sleep outside.Family’s like Tjaunda’s sleep in the same way by laying blankets on the floor and using any spare blankets to cover themselves against the cold at night.Family’s sleep in the same way by laying blankets on the floor and using any spare blankets to cover themselves against the cold at night.Most people who have migrated from Angola and have settled in this area don’t have a permanent home and live in temporary shelters not big enough to fit everyone in.A child wakes up after sleeping in the open at Otuzemba, an area in Opuwo where migrants coming from Angola have settled.Muazanapi, 38, and her children gets ready to carry wood over to the market in OpuwoA child and her family get ready to start the day after sleeping outside in the cold. Their future looks uncertain.In Otuzemba, an area in Opuwo where migrants coming from Angola have settled. There is no more room to sleep inside so many are forced to sleep outside.Woman from the Zemba tribe from a refugee camp in Opuwo go off in search of water to drink.A group of migrants gather around a residential area to collect water from the home of a local pastor in Opuwo. He offers the people free of charge.Kaupirukua Muandapela, 6, wakes up after sleeping out in the open in Otuzemba, an area in Opuwo where migrants coming from Angola have settled.Mbeungua, 47, and her daughter Ujama,6, on their way to Oukongo village where many Angolan migrants have settled.Mbeungua, 47, and her daughter Ujama,6, take a break in the blistering sun while on their way to Oukongo village where many Angolan migrants have settled.